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SPCH 1311 NE Malone (2): Home

How to use this guide

This guide is designed to provide helpful resources for A'Isha Malone's SPCH 1311 class. Below is a copy of your assignment and important dates to remember.

Getting Started- contains a helpful video about keyword searching and how to develop ideas for your paper.

Database tab - You will find databases geared towards helping you either find a topic to research (Issue databases) or where to find additional information regarding the topic you've chosen (Multi-subject databases). 

Images- Will provide you with resources to use for image searching and how to cite them.  

Evaluating and Citing Sources in MLA- Is everything you need to know about citing sources in MLA, Plagiarism, and evaluating websites

HELP!- Feeling lost? Still, need help picking a topic or finding more sources? Here are all the ways you can contact a librarian for additional help 

Helpful tip: You always want to find more sources than you need. Example: If your teacher says you need 5 cited sources you probably want to find 7-8 just so you have enough. 

Important Dates

Due Dates

April 10

Topic discussion board (10 points). Due in Canvas

April 19

Outline worksheet and 3 sources due in class .

April 21

Rough draft to practice with in class. 

April 24

Typed outline with sources (20 points) Due in Canvas.

April 24

Typed annotated bibliography research (10). Due in Canvas.

April 26

Speech, visual aid, and final typed outline (115). Due in class the day of your presentation.

May 8

Self-Evaluation/Reflection (10 points). Due no later than 11:59 pm.

Assignment

Informative Presentation

Remember Our theme for the semester is world changers!

Purpose: Select a person who you are interested in and/or interested in learning more about. This speech will cover biographical information about the person as well as discuss their contribution to society or their area of expertise. Make sure whoever you choose can be researched and that they have made an impact on the world. This impact could be felt globally, within their society or in their specific area of reach. So, for instance you could discuss the impact your favorite band has made on music as a whole or on other acts. Or you could choose a famous historical figure and discuss the impact that person made on our world today. Remember that you are not trying to advocate for a change. You aren’t persuading us that someone is the greatest of all time, should be in the hall of fame, should win their election, etc. Or you can select an event that has changed our world-using the criterion above (impact on the world. This impact could be felt globally or locally).

The speech will be delivered extemporaneously but you may use maximum 5 note cards. Your topic must be approved in advance, I will reply to all topic posts in the discussion board. Your informative speech will lead to your persuasive speech.

The speech

✓ Need outline with annotated bibliography. *See next page.

✓ 5-6 minutes in length. I do allow a 15 second grace period.

✓ At minimum 3-various sources to be orally cited. Who said it, what they said & where you found it; quote within context. * See next page.

✓ The introduction should have an attention getter, purpose, importance to audience and thesis & preview statements.

✓ The body should contain 2-3 main points. The steps of the introduction and conclusion should be clearly identifiable.

✓ Each main point should be clearly stated and developed.

✓ There should be a definite logical transition bridging each point (or subpoint) of the speech. You must have transitions between each main point, intro and conclusion.

✓ PowerPoint/Prezi/Emaze/Google Slides as your visual aid is required (general rule is 1 slide per min of speech).

✓ Topics due in the discussion board (see schedule).

✓ Any speech read directly from notes or PowerPoint will receive a grade no higher than a “C.”

✓ Any speech in which the minimum number of sources is not cited will receive a grade no higher than a “C.”

 ✓ Points will be deducted for speeches that don’t meet the time requirement (over or under). Review the rubric as your checklist.

✓ Remember your audience when brainstorming topics. Ask yourself, why does this matter to the class? How can I relate this to the class?

✓ See the speech toolbox link for sample outlines.

✓ Off limit topics: legalizing marijuana, anything illegal, gun rights, abortion, and religious conversions. Others may come up at instructor’s discretion. Topics must be approved first.

Grading/Due Dates

We will have several in class activities to help build this speech.

1. Topic discussion board (10 points). Due in Canvas April 10.

2. Outline worksheet and 3 sources due in class Tuesday, April 19.

3. Rough draft to practice with in class due Thursday, April 21.

4. Typed outline with sources (20 points) Due in Canvas April 24.

5. Typed annotated bibliography research (10). Due in Canvas April 24.

6. Speech, visual aid and final typed outline (115). Due in class the day of your presentation. Speeches begin April 26.

7. Self-Evaluation/Reflection (10 points). Due no later than 11:59pm May 8.

 

*Annotated Bibliography (10 points)

This annotated bibliography must include correct MLA or APA source citation for at least 3 quality academic sources, the support material from each source, the type of support material, and an oral citation, how will you say this in your speech. Add this to your informative outline. Make sure you use the library guide to help you with research and citing sources properly.

Below is an example of what you need for each source:

Piece of support: “About 20 percent of genes have been patented,” says Sandra Park, senior staff attorney with the ACLU's Women's Rights Project.”

What type of support is it? Statistic.

APA or MLA Citation: Jost, K. (2013, May 31). Patenting human genes. CQ Researcher, 23, 473-496. Retrieved from http://library.cqpress.com/cqresearcher/

Oral Citation: As reported in Patenting Human Genes, accessed May 31, 2013 Sandra Park states that, about 20 percent of genes have been patented.

1: Piece of Support:

A: What type of support is this?

B: APA or MLA citation:

C: Oral Citation/How will you say this in your speech:

2: Piece of Support:

A: What type of support is this?

B: APA or MLA citation:

C: Oral Citation/How will you say this in your speech:

3: Piece of Support:

A: What type of support is this?

B: APA or MLA citation:

 C: Oral Citation/How will you say this in your speech:

*Remember: Verbal citations build your ethos (credibility) with an audience. Verbal citing your sources during your speech is a graded component of your speech. It is not acceptable to simply list all of your sources at the beginning or end of your speech. Instead you will acknowledge the source when you give us specific support material.

Examples:

Magazine (Magazine Title & Date) “According to the March 15, 2020 issue of Newsweek . . . .”

Newspaper (Paper title & date) “The February 13, 2017 issue of The Chicago Tribune explains . . .

“ Book (Author, Title, & Date) “Jim Jones, in his 2006 book The Bulls are Washed Up, explains . . ..”

TV, Radio, Film (Title, & Date) “Only 15% of Americans own pets, this according to the March 15, 2018 episode of Dateline NBC.” Internet (Website and/or Author) “According to the American Cancer Society Website on May 3, 2017.

Internet (Website and/or Author) “According to the American Cancer Society Website on May 3, 2017 . . . “

“ Interview (Type, Who, Credibility & Date) “In a personal interview with Tarrant County College speech instructor A’Isha Malone, on Aug. 20, 2018, I learned that most people ignore audience analysis.”