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Criminal Justice 1301, Steve Romero: Part I - Crime: Problems, Measurement and Law

Crime and Criminal Justice, Chapter 1

Probation: Probation is a sanction that’s been ordered by the court system. A person is put on this when they’ve been found guilty of committing a crime. Probation lets a person stay in their community, so long as they’re being supervised by a probation officer. However, this is not an option for every single offense – some offenders go to jail or prison without ever having the offer of probation on the table.

CONDITIONS VARY FROM PERSON TO PERSON AND CASE TO CASE, AND CAN INCLUDE:

  • Community service
  • Counseling
  • Fines
  • Jail time
  • Reporting to the probation officer
  • Restitution
  • Restrictions on drugs and alcohol
  • Restrictions on weapons

WHAT ARE THE TWO TYPES OF PROBATION?

  • 1. Serving time in jail and then being put on probation after completing jail time. Often, the time is jail is shortened because the offender will be on probation.
  • 2. Going on probation instead of going to jail. As long as probation is completed successfully, the offender can skip their jail time.

Sometimes, people hate being on probation so much that they would rather go to jail, do their time, and be done with it. Since probation can last longer than jail time, this seems like a better option for some.

WHAT IS A PROBATION OFFICER’S ROLE?

  • Assessing the person on probation for needs they should have met.
  • Assessing the person on probation for risks they may pose.
  • Giving drug tests to make sure the person has not been drinking alcohol or doing drugs.
  • Helping the person to make sure they have access to any services they may need.
  • Monitoring the person to make sure that they’re following court orders.
  • Overseeing the person’s rehabilitation.
  • Preparing recommendations and reports that the court will use in their judgement.
  • Supporting the person to help them get their life back on track.
  • Visiting the home of the person on probation.

Comparison of Law Enforcement Levels of Jurisdiction:

Criminal Law, Chapter 3

Review Article -From the Ne er Do Well to the Criminal History Catrgory.pdf - Harcourt, B. E. (2003). From the ne'er-do-well to the criminal history category: The refinement of the actuarial model in criminal law. Law & Contemp.Probs., 66, 99.

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