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Earth Day 2021: In the Library

Celebrate Earth Day with TCC!

Print Book Gallery

A Better Planet

Sustainability has emerged as a global priority over the past several years. The 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change and the adoption of the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals through the United Nations have highlighted the need to address critical challenges such as the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, water shortages, and air pollution. But in the United States, partisan divides, regional disputes, and deep disagreements over core principles have made it nearly impossible to chart a course toward a sustainable future.

Attracting Birds and Butterflies

A quick-reference guide to attracting birds and butterflies for gardeners with little experience and time. In the eye of a bird or butterfly, the typical suburban landscape resembles an unfriendly desert. Closely mowed lawns, tightly clipped shrubs, raked-up borders, and deadheaded flowers mean no place to nest, no food to eat, and nowhere to hide. To the humans who live there, this means no bird songs, no colorful butterflies, no dazzling hummingbirds, no night-sparkling fireflies.   Creating a garden that welcomes these creatures may seem like a confusing and complicated task, but the principles involved are relatively simple.  

Big Ideas for Small Spaces

A practical guide to creating a green oasis in the city. Big Ideas for Small Spaces is for anyone with a small outdoor space that they wish to "green up". While the projects and advice are valuable to any gardener, they are especially useful to urbanites surrounded by concrete who nonetheless want to enjoy the soothing environment of a garden. Thirty step-by-step projects show how to transform balconies, windowsills, rooftops, pocket-sized patios, even walls, into features of lush greenery, grasses and blooms. 

Black Faces, White Spaces

Why are African Americans so underrepresented when it comes to interest in nature, outdoor recreation, and environmentalism? In this thought-provoking study, Carolyn Finney looks beyond the discourse of the environmental justice movement to examine how the natural environment has been understood, commodified, and represented by both white and black Americans. Bridging the fields of environmental history, cultural studies, critical race studies, and geography, Finney argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the "great outdoors" and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces. 

Braiding sweetgrass indigenous wisdom, scientific knowledge and the teachings of plants

As a botanist and professor of plant ecology, Robin Wall Kimmerer has spent a career learning how to ask questions of nature using the tools of science. As a Potawatomi woman, she learned from elders, family, and history that the Potawatomi, as well as a majority of other cultures indigenous to this land, consider plants and animals to be our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowing together to reveal what it means to see humans as "the younger brothers of creation."

Careers in Environmental Conservation

With threats to the environment on the rise, more jobs are being created in the field of environmental conservation than ever before. Comments from people in the industry, current statistics and forecasts, and realistic descriptions provide a useful look at environmental conservation jobs ranging from environmental educator to climate scientist to wildlife veterinarian.

Cast Away

Acclaimed poet and Young People's Poet Laureate Naomi Shihab Nye shines a spotlight on the things we cast away, from plastic water bottles to those less fortunate, in this collection of more than eighty original and never-before-published poems. A deeply moving, sometimes funny, and always provocative poetry collection for all ages.

Climate-Wise Landscaping

What can we do, right now, in our own landscapes, to help solve climate change? Sue Reed and Ginny Stibolt offer a rallying cry in response - instead of wringing our hands, let's roll up our sleeves. Based on decades of experience, this book is packed with simple, practical steps anyone can take to beautify any landscape or garden, while helping protect the planet and the species that call it home.

Defending Giants

Giant redwoods are American icons, paragons of grandeur, exceptionalism, and endurance. They are also symbols of conflict and negotiation, remnants of environmental battles over the limits of industrialization, profiteering, and globalization. Since the middle of the nineteenth century, logging operations have eaten away at the redwood forest, particularly areas covered by ancient giant redwoods. Today, such trees occupy a mere 120,000 acres. Their existence is testimony to the efforts of activists to rescue some of these giants from destruction.

Defining Documents in American History

Defining Documents in American History: Environment & Conservation offers in-depth analysis of a broad range of historical documents and historic events that shaped environmental and conservation issues throughout the American history. This text closely studies more than forty primary source documents to deliver a thorough examination of environmentally related events in the U.S. from 1872 to 2015.

Dig In!

Grow your own fruits and vegetables from nothing but kitchen scraps! Rather than throwing away leftovers from food in your kitchen, you can use them to grow more. Learn how to turn a single sweet potato into a pot full of them. Grow a salad from the end bit of lettuce and a lemon tree from a single seed. Several of these projects require nothing more than a jar, a windowsill, and a few pieces of food that would otherwise end up in the trash or compost. Step-by-step drawings and photographs make it easy to follow along, and fun recipes will help you enjoy the fruits of your labor.

DIY Hydroponic Gardens

Farmer Tyler show home DIYers how to build over a dozen hydroponics growing systems, some of which cost only a few dollars to make.

Earth from above, Updated Edition

After multiple journeys across five continents and sixty countries, acclaimed aerial photographer Yann Arthus-Bertrand created a comprehensive, unforgettable survey of the earth from a spectacular vantage point. For almost two decades, Arthus-Bertrand has continued to travel and photograph the planet, collecting new material that has never been published. In this updated edition, he reveals more than 100 new images and presents essays on current environmental and humanitarian issues by esteemed experts, including Nicholas Stern, Jane Goodall, Runa Khan, and Mathieu Ricard.

Erosion

Fierce, timely, and unsettling essays from an important and beloved writer and conservationist Terry Tempest Williams is one of our most impassioned defenders of public lands. A naturalist, fervent activist, and stirring writer, she has spoken to us and for us in books like The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America's National Parks and Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place. In these new essays, Williams explores the concept of erosion: of the land, of the self, of belief, of fear.

Grow Your Own Herbs

Nothing tastes better than herbs harvested fresh from the garden! Grow Your Own Herbs shares everything you need to know to grow the forty most important culinary herbs. You'll learn basic gardening information, including details on soil, watering, and potting. Profiles of 40 herbs--including popular varieties like basil, bay laurel, lemon verbena, tarragon, savory, thyme, and more--feature tasting notes, cultivation information, and harvesting tips. Additional information includes instructions for preserving and storing, along with techniques for making delicious pastes, syrups, vinegar, and butters. If you are new to gardening, have a limited space, or are looking to add fresh herbs to their daily meals, Grow Your Own Herbs is a must-have.

Indigenous Food Sovereignty in the United States

Centuries of colonization and other factors have disrupted indigenous communities' ability to control their own food systems. This volume explores the meaning and importance of food sovereignty for Native peoples in the United States, and asks whether and how it might be achieved and sustained. Unprecedented in its focus and scope, this collection addresses nearly every aspect of indigenous food sovereignty, from revitalizing ancestral gardens and traditional ways of hunting, gathering, and seed saving to the difficult realities of racism, treaty abrogation, tribal sociopolitical factionalism, and the entrenched beliefs that processed foods are superior to traditional tribal fare.

More from Less

From the coauthor of the New York Times bestseller The Second Machine Age, a compelling argument--masterfully researched and brilliantly articulated--that we have at last learned how to increase human prosperity while treading more lightly on our planet. Throughout history, the only way for humanity to grow was by degrading the Earth: chopping down forests, fouling the air and water, and endlessly digging out resources. Since the first Earth Day in 1970, the reigning argument has been that taking better care of the planet means radically changing course: reducing our consumption, tightening our belts, learning to share and reuse, restraining growth. Is that argument correct? Absolutely not. In More from Less, McAfee argues that to solve our ecological problems we don't need to make radical changes. Instead, we need to do more of what we're already doing: growing technologically sophisticated market-based economies around the world.

Natural Rivals

A dynamic examination that traces the lives of two of the most influential figures--and their dueling approaches--on America's natural landscape. John Muir, the most famous naturalist in American history, protected Yosemite, co-founded the Sierra Club, and is sometimes called the Father of the National Parks. A poor immigrant, self-taught, individualistic, and skeptical of institutions, his idealistic belief in the spiritual benefits of holistic natural systems led him to a philosophy of preserving wilderness unimpaired. Gifford Pinchot founded the U.S. Forest Service and advised his friend Theodore Roosevelt on environmental policy. Raised in wealth, educated in privilege, and interested in how institutions and community can overcome failures in individual virtue, Pinchot's pragmatic belief in professional management led him to a philosophy of sustainably conserving natural resources.   When these rivaling perspectives meet, what happens?

Nature's Best Hope

A New York Times bestseller Douglas W. Tallamy's first book, Bringing Nature Home, awakened thousands of readers to an urgent situation: wildlife populations are in decline because the native plants they depend on are fast disappearing. His solution? Plant more natives. In this new book, Tallamy takes the next step and outlines his vision for a grassroots approach to conservation. Nature's Best Hope shows how homeowners everywhere can turn their yards into conservation corridors that provide wildlife habitats.

No One Is Too Small to Make a Difference

In August 2018 a fifteen-year-old Swedish girl, Greta Thunberg, decided not to go to school one day in order to protest the climate crisis. Her actions sparked a global movement, inspiring millions of students to go on strike for our planet, forcing governments to listen, and earning her a Nobel Peace Prize nomination. No One Is Too Small to Make A Difference brings you Greta in her own words, for the first time. Collecting her speeches that have made history across the globe, from the United Nations to Capitol Hill and mass street protests, her book is a rallying cry for why we must all wake up and fight to protect the living planet, no matter how powerless we feel. Our future depends upon it.

Opinions Throughout History: Environmentalism

This new series from Grey House offers in-depth, single volumes that follow the debate, or path, to a decision on a controversial topic as it evolved throughout history. Each volume offers a wide range of opinion essays and editorials, speeches, and journal articles and expert analysis.

Our History Is the Future

In 2016, a small protest encampment at the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota, initially established to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, grew to be the largest Indigenous protest movement in the twenty-first century, attracting tens of thousands of Indigenous and non-Native allies from around the world. Its slogan "Mni Wiconi" Water is Life was about more than just a pipeline. Water Protectors knew this battle for Native sovereignty had already been fought many times before, and that, even after the encampment was gone, their anti-colonial struggle would continue. In Our History is the Future, Nick Estes traces traditions of Indigenous resistance leading to the #NoDAPL movement from the days of the Missouri River trading forts through the Indian Wars, the Pick-Sloan dams, the American Indian Movement, and the campaign for Indigenous rights at the United Nations.

Pollution, Politics, and Power

The electric power industry has been transformed over the past forty years, becoming more reliable and resilient while meeting environmental goals. A big question now is how to prevent backsliding. Pollution, Politics, and Power tells the story of the remarkable transformation of the electric power industry over the last four decades.

The Citizen's Guide to Climate Success

Sometimes solving climate change seems impossibly complex, and it is hard to know what changes we all can and should make to help. This book offers hope. Drawing on the latest research, Mark Jaccard shows us how to recognize the absolutely essential actions (decarbonizing electricity and transport) and policies (regulations that phase out coal plants and gasoline vehicles, carbon tariffs). Rather than feeling paralyzed and pursuing ineffective efforts, we can all make a few key changes in our lifestyles to reduce emissions, to contribute to the urgently needed affordable energy transition in developed and developing countries.

The Environmental Movement

When Rachel Carson described the dangers of DDT in the late 1950s she launched a movement that continues to influence society. The Environmental Movement provides a fascinating eco-tour from Carson through Earth Day, the environmental decade of the 1970s, and the challenges facing a new generation of twenty-first century environmentalists. This book examines how and why social change occurs and the lasting influence of the environmental movement.

Gardeners Guide to Succulents

The Gardener's Guide to Succulents is a stunning visual reference identifying over 125 plants from 40 different genera of succulents and cacti. Fleshy, spiny, hairy, flowering--and coming in every imaginable shape, color and size--this plant family has captured the affection of plant enthusiasts all over the world. This book provides a beautiful overview of the diversity that succulents have to offer, presenting a wide variety of popular plants to help you create striking, aesthetically pleasing compositions.

The Genius of Earth Day

The first Earth Day is the most famous little-known event in modern American history. Because we still pay ritual homage to the planet every April 22, everyone knows something about Earth Day. Some people may also know that Earth Day 1970 made the environmental movement a major force in American political life. But no one has told the whole story before.

The New Gardener's Handbook

Every new gardener has to start somewhere--and the process can be intimidating. Knowing when and what to plant, how to care for the plants once they're in the ground, and how to keep pests and diseases away is a lot to take on. Luckily, Daryl Beyers--an expert from the New York Botanical Garden--has written what will be a go-to resource for decades to come. The New Gardener's Handbook is a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals of gardening, based on the introductory gardening class that Beyers teaches at NYBG.

The Republican Reversal

Not long ago, Republicans could take pride in their party's tradition of environmental leadership. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the GOP helped to create the Environmental Protection Agency, extend the Clean Air Act, and protect endangered species. Today, as Republicans denounce climate change as a "hoax" and seek to dismantle the environmental regulatory state they worked to build, we are left to wonder: What happened?

US Environmental Policy in Action

US Environmental Policy in Action provides a comprehensive look at the creation, implementation, and evaluation of environmental policy, which is of particular importance in our current era of congressional gridlock, increasing partisan rhetoric, and escalating debates about federal/state relations. Now in its second edition, this volume includes updated case studies, two new chapters on food policy and natural resource policy, and revised public opinion data.

Vertical Garden Design

Vertical Garden Design is a complete encyclopaedia on the subject - and includes an interview with Patrick Blanc, the man credited as being the inventor of the vertical garden. In the interview, Mr Blanc shares his scientific research experience in the industry, illustrating successful projects, and offers his insight into and forecast of the industry's future trend. The book also provides guidance on how to design and build these amazing gardens, illustrating the three important parts in the process: Impacting Factors, Technical Systems and Cases.

The War on the EPA

As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) nears the half century mark, the public is largely apathetic towards the need for environmental protections. Today's problems are largely invisible, and to many people's eyes, the environment looks like it's doing just fine. The crippling smog and burning rivers of yesteryear are just a memory. In addition, Americans are repeatedly told that the EPA is hurting the economy, destroying jobs, and intruding into people's private lives. The truth is far more complicated. The War on the EPA: America's Endangered Environmental Protections examines the daunting hurdles facing the EPA in its critical roles in drinking water, air and water pollution, climate change, and toxic chemicals.

When Good Gardens Go Bad

Gardens do not take care of themselves. Poor soil, pests, disease, fungus, and inclement weather can ruin plants and a gardener's zeal. In When Good Gardens Go Bad, veteran author and pioneer organic gardener Judy Barrett offers safe, practical, and inexpensive advice for handling common garden problems and challenges. Plants thrive and fail for many reasons, but if you improve the soil, choose the right plants, plant them at the right time, and encourage them along the way, you will have far fewer failures and be able to take the credit when they flourish.

Wild about Weeds

Wild about Weeds is the must-have guide for modern gardeners that explains how to tame and nurture the most challenging of plants. Not all weeds are ugly uncontrollable brutes. Yes, they can be difficult and intimidating, but by learning how to grow weeds in unexpected ways you will become a better gardener with a more interesting garden. This book profiles over 50 weeds and shows you surprising ways to grow them, no matter what your garden type: from borders to boxes, sunny to shady, poor soil to rich, tropical to formal, Japanese-style to prairies. With interviews, tips and advice from celebrated gardeners, learn how to let weeds flourish without taking control.

Print Books List

See the list below for books related to Earth Day and gardening that are held in the TCC Libraries. These books are available now for checkout via curbside/front door pickup!